In one of my first posts, I  argued that while all political parties are political coalitions, some people aren't worth having in the coalition.  They may be reliable votes, but partnering with them requires

Politics, Zombies, and Taylor Swift

By David Paitsel

In one of my first posts, I  argued that while all political parties are political coalitions, some people aren’t worth having in the coalition.  They may be reliable votes, but partnering with them requires compromising your principles and defending a lot of ugly behavior and attitudes.  In the short term, they might win you an election or two, but they make it damn hard to look at yourself in the mirror.  They drive away more voters than they attract, turn vital demographics against you, and damage your reputation with decent people.

If Donald Trump and his supporters couldn’t teach Republicans this lesson, Roy Moore should.  His political history, personal beliefs, and  policy positions should have been enough for most Republicans to repudiate him, but the spectacle of so-called conservatives throwing aside character, values, and human decency to defend Moore against allegations of sexual assault against teenage girls should drive home how much they have soiled themselves to attract the kind of voters Trump and Moore bring to the table.

And before we fall over ourselves giving credit to the dozen or so Republicans who have publicly called for Moore to step aside, let’s remember nearly all of them still support a president who not only boasted about barging into dressing rooms at Miss Teen USA pageants to see undressed teenage girls, but bragged about getting away with sexual assault (grabbing ’em by the pussy) because he’s a celebrity.

Republicans destroyed their good name, sold out their principles, and betrayed the country when they allowed Trump to become the standard bearer of their party.  I will not vote Republican again until people like Trump, Moore, and their supporters are driven from the party in disgrace.  So long as they tolerate these people in their party, they do not deserve our votes.

Walking Dead

For years, fans have complained about slow episodes, long story arcs, and character development.  It seems the producers took those criticisms to heart when they wrote season eight.  It’s non-stop action, but it’s dull.

Since the survivors arrived in Alexandria, the show has introduced a host of new characters, but it turns out those slow episodes and long story arcs are kind of important, because it’s difficult for viewers to invest in any of them when the writers don’t spent time developing them.  By the time the writers made King Ezekiel human in last week’s episode, “Some Guy,” I had already spent forty-five minutes kind of hoping he’d get whacked so we could get back to Rick, Daryl, and all the other characters I have watched for years.

I’m complaining (a little), but I’ll keep tuning in.  I have to be honest, though: at this point, the third season of the spin-off, Fear the Walking Dead, was far better than anything churned out by its parent series in a long time.  Dave Erickson, Fear‘s show runner, is leaving and turning it over to the Walking Dead team.  I’m afraid they might ruin it.  We’ll see.

I don’t get it

OK, I’m in my late forties, but I’m not totally out of it.  I don’t understand why everyone thinks Taylor Swift is so amazing.  I’ll admit she has had a few catchy hit singles, but the media has treated the release of her new album like a new masterpiece by Mozart.  I don’t hear anything special.

I’ll write more about music in future posts, but for now, I’ll happily admit that maybe I am over the hill.  I don’t get the breathless anticipation for all things Taylor Swift.

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